JUVENILE LAW (ages 16 and under)

Crimes committed by children under the age of 17 are legally referred to as juvenile delinquents, juvenile offenders, youthful offenders or delinquent minors. America’s youth make mistakes on a regular basis. As they develop their cognitive skills, they are taught the difference between right and wrong as well as the rules and laws of society. Youthful ignorance and misconceptions can lead young people in the wrong direction where they will ultimately make mistakes, and the law must therefore recognize that adults and children are inherently different and must therefore be treated accordingly when criminal proceedings are involved.

Generally, the goal of the juvenile justice system is to implement rehabilitation methods aimed at permanently keeping youth out of the criminal justice system. After a juvenile is arrested, there is a procedure to determine where the individual will be prosecuted. Meaning, a juvenile can be tried as an adult in criminal court based on the severity of the alleged offense(s). A juvenile facing felony charges, could be tried as an adult if the criminal offense is a class A or class B designated felony. In order for a juvenile to be tried as an adult, they must be at least 13 years of age.

To increase the child’s chances of rehabilitation, we will negotiate alternative sentencing, such as participation in a diversion program or juvenile probation. If a juvenile is adjudicated delinquent, David Lee Windecher knows how to argue for more favorable sentencing and placement, such as a lesser confinement term with the juvenile moved from a high-risk facility to a lower-risk facility.

With extensive experience in the field of juvenile law due to being arrested 13 times by the age of 19, David Lee Windecher understands how the system works and how to best protect your child from becoming a repeat offender. Contact us today to learn how to properly protect your child.

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